Bristol Ornithological Club
Jun 03 2014

Tuesday 03 – 10 June – Club Holiday to Iceland (pics to follow)

 A group of 16 led by Wendy Dickson flew from Heathrow to Keflavik, with a bus journey to Reykjavik’s domestic airport introducing us to the blue lupin-covered rocky landscape. We then took a further flight north to Akureyri and drove through rainy, misty conditions to Husavik, a fishing and whaling town on the north coast. There were good views of Ptarmigan and Black-tailed Godwits on the way.

Day 2 of the trip dawned – a beautiful sunny day – (similar weather stayed with us for the whole trip) with views of the magnificent sea bay bound by snow-capped mountains. The sound of the Redwings singing like Sedge Warblers competed with the many Snipe drumming above our heads. We had excellent views of two Short-eared Owls flying high overhead. Half the group went on a whale watching trip and saw Minke and Humpback whales and Harbour Porpoises, with a good range of seabirds, whilst others birdwatched from the harbourside seeing Eiders, Red-breasted Mergansers, Glaucous Gull, Common Scoters and a pair of Harlequin Ducks. During the afternoon we explored the Tjornes peninsula, picnicking near cliffs with good views of nesting Fulmars and with rafts of Puffins on the sea. We also had our first Gyrfalcon sighting. We then drove inland to Lake Myvatn, a large inland lake sitting in a partially farmed tundra-like plain. The lake is famous for its flies and the breeding wildfowl they attract.

Day 3, the morning was spent around Lake Myvatn and we had abundant views of Red-necked Phalaropes, Tufted and Long-tailed Ducks, Barrow’s Goldeneye, Scaup, Slavonian Grebes and Great Northern Divers. A short drive from the Hotel we found a part of the Laxa River with large numbers of Harlequin Ducks. The afternoon was spent at a local nature reserve where the highlight was a sighting of a male Crossbill. We also found an American Wigeon on the lake near Reykjahlid.

Day 4, we drove inland across miles of lava moonscape to Dettifoss, a spectacular waterfall, with Selfoss, another one just up river. We lunched by a small river where we saw our first Dunlin in summer plumage and a pair of Pink-footed Geese nesting. We visited Namafjall – sulphur springs with bubbling black and yellow mud springs and fumeroles. On our return to the hotel via the nature reserve we had another Gyrfalcon sighting, this time a juvenile.

Day 5, we returned to Husavik to gain a day’s respite from the flies! (Insect nets to protect your face were a must at Myvatn!) An enjoyable day was spent exploring – some members visiting the Whale Museum. Further good views of Iceland and Glaucous Gulls. On the return journey we visited Godafoss, another beautiful waterfall, and had handsome views of Snow Bunting.

Day 6, a few members climbed the 900 foot volcanic peak of Vindbelgjarfall, whilst others searched for birds and plants below. We visited the Fuglasafn Bird Centre and a short walk away had beautiful views of a pair of Red-throated Divers and their single chick. Following the warm weather, the flies were particularly abundant and irritating. At times the air was filled with a loud hum as new hatchings erupted forming eight-foot-high columns of dense insects.

Day 7, we had an early start to return to Akureyri for our return flight to Reykjavik, but still added to our trip list with Bullfinch seen and a Goldcrest heard. In Reykjavik the group split, with some meeting friends, others exploring the city and a group exploring the foreshore of the Reykjavik Peninsula. At last – a Purple Sandpiper was seen and Turnstones in summer plumage. We then went to our final hotel, the Northern Light Inn, set in a rocky landscape, sited with a power station on one side and the Blue Lagoon geo-thermally heated pools on the other. Some members enjoyed the luxurious Blue Lagoon ‘experience’.

Day 8, we explored the coast near to Grindavik, searching unsuccessfully for the elusive Brunnich’s Guillemot. But some of us had fleeting glimpses of Orca whales .

The Bird count for the trip was 69 species, with 66 plant species identified.

Thanks to:- Wendy Dickson for leading. Alison Levinson and Judy Copeland for organising. Alistair Fraser & Andy Senior, Sue & Nigel Kempson for driving. Julie Evans for photography. Lois Pryce, Sue & Nigel Kempson, for trip notes. Jean Oliver for plant ID and everyone else for their company. Also thanks to Richard Belson, Tony Scott and Thordis Gudmundsdottir for their great help before and during the trip which was invaluable.

Sue Kempson & Lois Pryce

 

 

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