Bristol Ornithological Club
Jun 04 2015

Club Holiday – Finland 04 to 08 June 2015

 Thirteen members travelled to Finland for an Owl Prowl extraordinaire. The main targets were owls and woodpeckers and the first evening saw us viewing Ural Owl chicks and an adult, closely followed by a Pygmy Owl perched near its nest box. The following day we added two adult and two young Great Grey Owls and a pair of Lesser Spotted Woodpeckers feeding young. A particular highlight was half an hour spent watching a Three-toed Woodpecker trying to feed a massive Goat Moth grub to its young at least ten times before giving up and trying to eat the grub itself. Even the adult struggled to cut it up to eat it.

The first hotel backed onto the Gulf of Bothnia and since it never really got dark certain members stayed out until 11.30pm and started before 6.00am to find Marsh Harrier, many Sedge Warblers, a selection of ducks, terns and gulls (lovely Little Gulls) and Woodcock. The wader list was building with Little Ringed Plover and Spotted Redshank in breeding plumage together with display flights by Common Snipe, or you could watch the Pied and Spotted Flycatchers, Lesser Whitethroats and Fieldfare just outside your bedroom windows. The local Redwings were also singing rather than calling – a new sound to most. The Saturday early shift came up trumps for “One Lucky Member” – a Terek Sandpiper on the very small mud bar visible at the edge of the Gulf. Various sites in Oulu provided Common Rosefinch, Yellow Wagtails (thunbergi) and a nesting pair of Slavonian Grebes, Thrush Nightingale singing loudly and showing fleetingly and a Blyth’s Reed Warbler. Liminka Bay nature reserve produced distant ducks including Smew, Goldeneye and Goosander, together with close up views of Little Gull, Marsh Harrier and just as we were leaving the viewing platform a bonus bird – a Gull-billed Tern just 2,500km north of its expected range. The Gulf coast gave at least 30 Whooper Swans and Arctic and Common Terns having a duel and the forest produced Harriers (Pallid and Hen) and two Ortolan Buntings. Once in Kusamo we headed straight off to see two Siberian Tit adults feeding young, and finally a Tengmalm’s Owl sitting in its nest box before the rain started. In the rain on Sunday we drove for miles on forest tracks (no wonder the Finns are so good at rally driving!) and various stops were made for two Black Grouse and two Capercaillies on the track. Some of the many lakes visited gave White-tailed Eagle eating its prey on the far bank and Red-necked Grebes, a distant Pochard (unusual for Finland), at least ten Velvet Scoters and three Smew quite close to us. A Dipper was feeding its youngsters and diving into a torrent of water while we tried to shelter from torrential rain –poetic justice? Our perseverance finally paid off when we had views of two Siberian Jays as they flitted through the trees by the track, a Black Woodpecker feeding its three young and at last a Hawk Owl. We all piled out and had excellent views of the owl perched on a tree before someone noticed a flat tyre on the second van. Luckily the rain had more or less stopped while the spare wheel was fitted. On the route back to the hotel we spotted a Black Grouse lek with two males performing and two other males just watching. Dinner was a traditional Finnish dish of Reindeer which was too much for some members after seeing so many in the forests.

Our final day dawned with blue sky and a cool wind. After more searching, our Finnature guide eventually found a Hazel Grouse walking around in the undergrowth by the track. Over the next 15 minutes it even crossed the road a couple of times so everyone had good views. Abiding memories of the trip – forests and lakes; Owls and Woodpeckers; birding until the sun set at 11.30pm and out again before 6am; Pied and Spotted Flycatchers outside the bedroom window; Hazel Grouse; good food (those breakfasts!); great company from all the participants and the rally driving along the forest tracks. Overall the group saw 134 species in the four days we spent in Finland and everyone had some life birds.

Thanks to Jane for her excellent organisation, our two drivers Andy and Gary and to Pirita, our Finnature guide, without whom we would never have found all the owls, woodpeckers and grouse.

Keith Williams

 

Feb 22 2015

Sunday 22 to 26 February – France – Lac du Der, Champagne Region.

Thirteen of us drove to Saint-Dizier in the Champagne Region of north-east France to visit the Lac du Der, noted for its large number of migratory Cranes. The lake is a flood defence and the water level can vary considerably but it was very full after recent rains. The countryside to the west is flat, chalky, intensively cultivated and not much good for wildlife but the lake is very extensive, surrounded by mixed,mainly deciduous, woodland. The woods are worked for firewood and timber, with only a few ancient trees, but it creates a varied habitat. We self-catered in the daytime with supplies from the supermarket and ate in a local restaurant in the evening. Between meals we managed a bit of birding.The Cranes didn’t disappoint. We could see small groups feeding in the fields, all around the lake and flying in larger groups overhead. Towards late afternoon/early evening thousands fly in to roost on low islands in the lake. The sight of the incoming birds is reminiscent of the winter Starling roost on the levels! During the few days of our stay large groups of Cranes, sometimes circling to gain height, were seen in flight moving further north and east with one group of about 100 birds in a perfect V-formation. Great White Egrets, a rarity here not many years ago, were very common in the fields and around the lake. Grey Herons were numerous, Little Egret almost absent – just three were seen. A lone Spoonbill was feeding in a creek, dwarfed by a nearby Great White Egret. We saw two unexpected White Storks by a small pond in a field on the way back to the hotel and the following day we saw one on a nest in nearby Eclaron. The owner of the biggest house in the village had built a nesting platform for them on the roof but the birds had ignored this and chosen to build a 1.5m stack of sticks on the adjacent chimneys. The stork was soon joined by its mate carrying nesting material and they engaged in the activities that birds do when they really love each other. The lady whose house we obstructed to look at the birds told us they are year-round residents, not migrants. Other water birds: vast numbers of Coots, Great Crested Grebes and Pochard, with a few Red-crested Pochard among the flocks. Good numbers of Gadwall, Tufted Duck, Goldeneye, Teal, Pintail, Goosander, Shoveler, Mallard, Mute and Bewick’s Swans. Geese: Greylag, White-fronted and one Bean. Two or three Black-necked and Little Grebes were tracked down, plus some Wigeon and Shelduck. Smew should have been more numerous but we did eventually locate nine birds in one small lagoon, including some attractive white males. Waders included Curlew, Golden Plover, Lapwing and Ruff with some small, distant birds that could have been Dunlin or Little Stint, a few Snipe and a Common Sandpiper. Gulls: Yellow-legged, Common, Black-headed and Lesser Black-backed. Also by the lake, we found plenty of Water Pipits with some good views of obliging specimens, Kingfishers and a couple of Reed Buntings. Raptors: White-tailed Eagle (three or four), several migrating Red Kites, Common Buzzards, Peregrine (at least three), one Marsh Harrier, and a Sparrowhawk above the park in Saint-Dizier. Marsh Harriers used to breed here but were lost when agriculture intensified, and they are a rare winter visitor.The woods were full of woodpeckers: Great Spotted, Middle Spotted, Green and Black. Great and Middle Spotted are hard to distinguish by sight (I find) as the views are often fleeting. Their calls, however, are distinctive, even to the novice. Tip: take an expert with you and they will tell you what you are looking at. We heard Black Woodpeckers in several places but they were hard to see until on the last day we returned to a woodland patch for one more look and found one high up on a bare branch. It sat there long enough for us to pile out of the van to see it, hear it and take photos. Other notable woodland birds were Short-toed Treecreeper (distinguishable by its call), Hawfinch (seen but mainly heard), Marsh and Willow Tits, Nuthatch, Firecrest, Goldcrest, Bullfinch, a couple of Siskins and the expected common woodland species. The final addition for the trip was Grey Partridge in the fields by a French service station on the way back. The species tally was 92 during three and a bit days. Thanks to everyone who attended for good company and expert advice. A particular thanks to Ken and Lys for organising the trip and for their extensive recce beforehand. Alastair Fraser

Oct 10 2014

10 – 13 October 2014 – North Norfolk Weekend

 This trip was billed as “something of a twitch fest” but it didn’t often feel that way, partly because most of the rarities we sought, either fell into our laps or else defied long and painstaking efforts to locate them. En route to Norfolk we saw a large number of Red Kites from the minibus, but our first birding stop was just outside Bedford, where, within minutes of arrival, we were all enjoying close-up views of a very confiding Hoopoe. When we reached East Anglia we had a bit of a problem finding Lynford Arboretum, but once there, Jay, Siskin and Goldcrest showed readily enough, but not our target birds, Hawfinch and Crossbill. We reached our hotel about 1800 hrs and had an excellent dinner – indeed the excellence of the food was a feature of the whole weekend!
Saturday dawned bright, and after breakfast our first port of call was Thornham, where the tide was high and birds were everywhere. Twite was the only scarce bird seen, and that by only a minority of those present but all of us saw Skylark, Wheatear, Stonechat, Meadow Pipit, Reed Bunting, Grey and Golden Plover, Lapwing, Sanderling, Turnstone, Bar-tailed Godwit, Wigeon, Teal, Shelduck and great skeins of Pink-footed and Brent Geese – a wonderful place! Then on to Burnham Norton where a Steppe Grey Shrike had been seen for several days – just follow the walkers and when you see a large crowd, stop and admire! Which is just what we did – the admiration being at a distance of less than ten metres. Nearer the sea we located White Wagtail and Redshank, whilst two lucky folk saw a Jack Snipe which flew about 30 yards and disappeared. We then went on to Lady Anne’s Drive at Holkham where we had our picnic lunch accompanied by several flocks of incoming Redwings passing overhead. After lunch we set off in search of Yellow-browed Warbler. Two hours later we had seen lots more Pink-footed and Brent Geese and added Kestrel and Marsh Harrier to our list but no Yellow-browed Warbler. Never mind – there’s another one at Titchwell! That one was eventually heard by a few but seen by none. Our search was cut short by an approaching thunderstorm but there was always tomorrow.
Sunday’s pre-breakfast excursion yielded Oystercatcher, Turnstone, Ringed Plover and Knot, but viewing was hampered by fog. This cleared after breakfast as we went east towards Cley, but at Cley itself the fog was still present. Undeterred we set off along the East Bank, admired a perched Marsh Harrier with a very yellow head, and then spent a happy 20 minutes being entertained by half a dozen or so Bearded Tits. Later we added Common Snipe, Black-tailed Godwit and Water Rail to our list. We lunched at Burnham Overy Staithe and surprised a group from Birmingham by our lukewarm reaction to the presence of a Great White Egret about 400 metres away! We were far more enthusiastic about an enormous flock of Pink-footed Geese flying overhead, with a smaller skein of Greylag Geese going in the other direction. Back to Titchwell, where we were rewarded by Common Scoter, Sanderling, Common Tern, Red-breasted Merganser and Razorbill from the beach and Avocet, Little Stint and three Spotted Redshanks from the fresh marsh hide. A few of us managed to spot Firecrest here, but, of course, we searched unsuccessfully for Yellow-browed Warbler!
Monday greeted us with gales and heavy rain, which persisted all day. We decided to go back to Titchwell, being the only birding spot with plenty of indoor hide space. We saw 14 Little Gulls (at times being pushed backwards by the wind), Pintail, Gadwall and Greenshank but after two hours we gave up and returned to the car park where we saw our first Grey Wagtail (but still no Yellow-browed Warbler!). We returned to Bristol via Hunstanton where we searched unsuccessfully for a reported Great Grey Shrike; and made a second diversion round the Wolverton Triangle, where we failed to find Golden Pheasant. Never mind – the weekend species count was 110 – not bad for a “twitch fest”! Particular thanks are due to Jane Cumming for her planning and leadership of a most enjoyable weekend, and to Nick Hawkridge and Alastair Fraser, who drove impeccably – sometimes in really horrible driving conditions.

Jun 03 2014

Tuesday 03 – 10 June – Club Holiday to Iceland (pics to follow)

 A group of 16 led by Wendy Dickson flew from Heathrow to Keflavik, with a bus journey to Reykjavik’s domestic airport introducing us to the blue lupin-covered rocky landscape. We then took a further flight north to Akureyri and drove through rainy, misty conditions to Husavik, a fishing and whaling town on the north coast. There were good views of Ptarmigan and Black-tailed Godwits on the way.

Day 2 of the trip dawned – a beautiful sunny day – (similar weather stayed with us for the whole trip) with views of the magnificent sea bay bound by snow-capped mountains. The sound of the Redwings singing like Sedge Warblers competed with the many Snipe drumming above our heads. We had excellent views of two Short-eared Owls flying high overhead. Half the group went on a whale watching trip and saw Minke and Humpback whales and Harbour Porpoises, with a good range of seabirds, whilst others birdwatched from the harbourside seeing Eiders, Red-breasted Mergansers, Glaucous Gull, Common Scoters and a pair of Harlequin Ducks. During the afternoon we explored the Tjornes peninsula, picnicking near cliffs with good views of nesting Fulmars and with rafts of Puffins on the sea. We also had our first Gyrfalcon sighting. We then drove inland to Lake Myvatn, a large inland lake sitting in a partially farmed tundra-like plain. The lake is famous for its flies and the breeding wildfowl they attract.

Day 3, the morning was spent around Lake Myvatn and we had abundant views of Red-necked Phalaropes, Tufted and Long-tailed Ducks, Barrow’s Goldeneye, Scaup, Slavonian Grebes and Great Northern Divers. A short drive from the Hotel we found a part of the Laxa River with large numbers of Harlequin Ducks. The afternoon was spent at a local nature reserve where the highlight was a sighting of a male Crossbill. We also found an American Wigeon on the lake near Reykjahlid.

Day 4, we drove inland across miles of lava moonscape to Dettifoss, a spectacular waterfall, with Selfoss, another one just up river. We lunched by a small river where we saw our first Dunlin in summer plumage and a pair of Pink-footed Geese nesting. We visited Namafjall – sulphur springs with bubbling black and yellow mud springs and fumeroles. On our return to the hotel via the nature reserve we had another Gyrfalcon sighting, this time a juvenile.

Day 5, we returned to Husavik to gain a day’s respite from the flies! (Insect nets to protect your face were a must at Myvatn!) An enjoyable day was spent exploring – some members visiting the Whale Museum. Further good views of Iceland and Glaucous Gulls. On the return journey we visited Godafoss, another beautiful waterfall, and had handsome views of Snow Bunting.

Day 6, a few members climbed the 900 foot volcanic peak of Vindbelgjarfall, whilst others searched for birds and plants below. We visited the Fuglasafn Bird Centre and a short walk away had beautiful views of a pair of Red-throated Divers and their single chick. Following the warm weather, the flies were particularly abundant and irritating. At times the air was filled with a loud hum as new hatchings erupted forming eight-foot-high columns of dense insects.

Day 7, we had an early start to return to Akureyri for our return flight to Reykjavik, but still added to our trip list with Bullfinch seen and a Goldcrest heard. In Reykjavik the group split, with some meeting friends, others exploring the city and a group exploring the foreshore of the Reykjavik Peninsula. At last – a Purple Sandpiper was seen and Turnstones in summer plumage. We then went to our final hotel, the Northern Light Inn, set in a rocky landscape, sited with a power station on one side and the Blue Lagoon geo-thermally heated pools on the other. Some members enjoyed the luxurious Blue Lagoon ‘experience’.

Day 8, we explored the coast near to Grindavik, searching unsuccessfully for the elusive Brunnich’s Guillemot. But some of us had fleeting glimpses of Orca whales .

The Bird count for the trip was 69 species, with 66 plant species identified.

Thanks to:- Wendy Dickson for leading. Alison Levinson and Judy Copeland for organising. Alistair Fraser & Andy Senior, Sue & Nigel Kempson for driving. Julie Evans for photography. Lois Pryce, Sue & Nigel Kempson, for trip notes. Jean Oliver for plant ID and everyone else for their company. Also thanks to Richard Belson, Tony Scott and Thordis Gudmundsdottir for their great help before and during the trip which was invaluable.

Sue Kempson & Lois Pryce

 

 

Feb 14 2014

Friday to Sunday 14,15 & 16 February – Kent

 We left Bristol early Friday morning in a gale. Our first notable birds were Red Kites as we drove along the M4. After a brief stop at Services on the M25 to meet up with the rest of the group travelling by car we carried on to Cliffe Pools. We met Lynn Griffiths, a member who had recently moved to the area, who guided us round the pools. The rain and gales worsened but despite this we had good views of Pintail, Shoveler and Goldeneye at our first stop. Further along on a strip of land not under water there was a large flock of Black-tailed Godwits with Dunlin, Redshank and Lapwing. Upon reaching the Thames side there were Avocet and Shelduck on the foreshore.
Saturday proved to be slightly better weather-wise, but there were still gales. We first went to the Riverside Country Park where after leaving the minibus we had to dive for cover due to a hailstorm which passed through quickly. Along the riverside were Meadow Pipits and Grey Plover. At the point there were more Grey Plovers, Oystercatchers, Wigeon, Teal, Shelducks, Godwits, Redshanks and Dunlin. We went on to Bedlams Bottom where there was a nice flock of Avocet and more waders.

In the wind

In the wind

We continued to Capel Fleet where good views were had of Marsh Harriers

Marsh Harrier

Marsh Harrier

and a nice surprise was a pair of Green Sandpipers disturbed by the harriers. When we arrived at Elmley Marshes the wind had got up again and we seemed to be blown sideways. Along the path there were many Lapwings, Godwits, Wigeons and Teal. Approaching the hide we had to hurry as another storm was brewing. Wading across the submerged bridge to the hide the heavens opened again. We had good views of Brent Geese, Marsh Harriers, Golden Plover and Grey Plover plus many more Lapwings. Leaving the hide the sky was as black as night and the rain came down again. The rain relented and the wind almost dried us off by the time we reached the minibus.
Sunday, and what a difference! There were blue skies and no wind. What a relief! We travelled to Dungeness with a promise of Penduline Tit which had been reported the previous day. On arrival we went straight to the hide where they had been seen but, alas, they were not there. But we had good views of Smew and Little Gull. We left and continued to the beach for lunch where Kittiwakes,

Kittiwake

Kittiwake

Guillemots and Great Northern Diver were seen. On returning to the reserve two Black-throated Divers were seen on the pools by the road. The missing Penduline Tits were reported at another pool so we went to look for them. After an hour there was no sign of them but we were treated to good views of a Bearded Tit on top of a reed. At the gatehouse our last sightings were of Tree Sparrow and Reed Bunting which was a nice end to the trip. The weekend tally was 95 species which was a pretty good count for a wet weekend.

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